Sunday, July 31, 2011

Dan Uggla Update, Zach Attacked!

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Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla is starting to salvage his season, thanks to a solid month of July at the plate.

Yesterday, Uggla hit a 3-run home run in the Braves 5-1 win over the Florida Marlins, extending his hitting streak to 21 games. That's the good news.

The bad news is, he still only has a .206 batting average.

But since we live in a "what have you done for me lately" world, Uggla should, no doubt, be feeling better about his performance these days. On July 4, the day before the hitting streak began, Uggla had a paltry .173 batting average. On July 5, his 21-game hitting streak began. During the streak, he has batted .295 which has helped push his average over the Mendoza Line (.200) to it's current .206 level.

Uggla also leads the Braves with 20 home runs which is always a "feel-good" medicine. No doubt.

And then there's the plight of Baltimore Orioles starter Zach Britton--

Poor Zach. I wonder if "mama told him there'd be days like this"?

Here are the pitching stats for Britton's last two starts--
  • July 8 at Boston Red Sox: 0.2 IP, 6 H, 8 R, 7 ER
  • July 30 at New York Yankees: 0.1 IP, 7 H, 9 R, 6 ER

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Britton became the first player in major-league history to allow eight-or-more runs while lasting less than an inning in each of two consecutive starts.

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After the Boston massacre on July 8, Britton was sent down to the minor leagues and spent almost a month in Class-AA Bowie. He was recalled on Friday July 29 and was penciled in to pitch on Saturday July 30 against the Yankees. When recalled (on Friday) Britton told the Baltimore Sun, "Good to see the guys again, kind of a rough stretch going down there and watching the guys on TV. So it's good to be back."

Um--

Be careful what you wish for, Zach!

Friday, July 29, 2011

The MLB on TSC: The Good, The Bad and The Uggla

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Time for a mini-edition of the MLB on TSC to take a quick look at some odds and ends around Major League Baseball. Let's take a look at the good, the bad and the uggla (yes, Uggla) for this past week.

Here goes--

THE GOOD (Part 1)

KUDOS to Los Angeles Angels starter Ervin Santana for pitching the third no-hitter of the 2011 season. Santana followed in the footsteps of Francisco Liriano and Justin Verlander who earlier in the season tossed no-nos of their own. All three no-hitters this season have been on the road. As for Santana, he pitched his gem against the Cleveland Indians, a team that Santana had lost to in his previous six starts against them. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Santana is the first pitcher in major-league history to throw a no-hitter versus a team that had previously beaten him at least six times without a loss. Now that's what I call SWEET revenge.

THE GOOD (Part 2)
AP Photo

DOUBLE KUDOS to Florida Marlins manager Jack McKeon. Since taking over the team, the 80-year old McKeon has guided the Marlins (52-53) back to respectability. On June 19, the day then-manager Edwin Rodriguez resigned, the Marlins were 32-40, on a 10-game losing streak and drowning in a 1-19 quagmire.

Under McKeon, the team as gone 20-13 (.606) and is at the brink of being above water again. So much for the criticism the octogenarian received for being (quote, unquote) too old to manage.

Wow, check out his fist-pump! The old man still got it. No doubt.

THE BAD

Shame on me for jumping on the Colorado Rockies bandwagon earlier in the year. On April 17, the Rockies were a staggering 12-3 (.800) and were the talk of the baseball world. Since then, they have gone a disappointing 37-53 and have left many of us wondering-- WHAT HAPPENED?

And finally--

THE UGGLA

Yes I know, it should be THE UGLY, but Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla is the one guy who this season has lived up to his last name thus far. Uggla (.205 BA) has recently raised his batting average above the dreaded Mendoza Line (.200 BA). To put in perspective how bad things have been for Uggla-- when he recently extended his hitting streak to 15 games, his batting average was still below the Mendoza Line. According to Elias, Uggla became the first player in modern major-league history (since 1900) with a batting average below .200 at the end of a player's 15th game of a single-season hitting streak. Even after extending his hitting streak to 17 games, Uggla was still batting only .199. He finally pushed his BA over the Mendoza Line by going 3 for 4 and extending the hitting streak to 18 games.

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For the record, he's currently at .205 and has a 19-game hitting streak. His average was .178 when the streak began. Now that's what I call uggla! Ooooops, I meant ugly!

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Jim Thome's Bum Rap

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Why isn't Jim Thome's pursuit of 600 home runs getting any BUZZ?

Thome recently hit career home run No. 596 putting him 4 shy of the "magical" 600-home runs milestone and nobody is talking about it. I wonder why? When Derek Jeter was 4 hits shy of 3000 it was the talk of the baseball world and when he finally got to 3000 it was as if he had parted the Red Sea.

So why isn't Thome getting any Jeter-type love for his milestone pursuit?

In 3 words: The Steroid Era.

And three names in particular--

Barry Bonds. Sammy Sosa. Alex Rodriguez.

The above three, along with Ken Griffey Jr, have all reached the 600-HR milestone within the last decade, taking away some of the GUSTO from the once-treasured milestone.

Heck, with the exception of Junior, those three (above) players took away ALL THE GUSTO from the milestone which was once considered hallowed grounds in baseball.

As for Griffey, his membership was well accepted and didn't DENT the aura of the milestone. But even he didn't get the Jeter-type buzz when he hit No. 600.

As for the other three? Well, the fact that those three (suspected or admitted) steroid users are in the club has COMPLETELY SHATTERED the mystique that 600-HR once used to have....

....And that doesn't help Thome.

Besides, Thome has never really been a media darling anyway and his current .223 AVG as a part-time DH isn't helping his cause either. He's viewed as a has-been who is just hanging around to collect the milestone and then run off into the sunset.

Also, the record number of home runs hit during the Steroid Era has become the DARK SYMBOL of the era itself, so nowadays high home run totals are looked at with a suspicious eye by the average fan. Just ask Jose Bautista.

Thome, himself, has NEVER (I repeat, NEVER) been suspected of doing any sort of performance enhancing drug BUT-- unfortunately for him, he played in the same era with the aforementioned 3 players and-- fairly or unfairly-- he is a victim of guilt by association.

For Thome, and Bautista for that matter, this is a real BUM RAP. No doubt.

But as long as the aforementioned three names appear on the 600-HR list, the iconic-aura that the milestone once had will NEVER come back. EVER! Take that to the bank!

As for Jeter--

si.com/vault
Jeter's milestone, on the other hand, has been REVERED! It has been SANCTIFIED! WORSHIPED! DIVINED! You name it! He even has an HBO documentary called "Derek Jeter 3K" which premieres tonight. It highlights Jeter's "magical" chase to 3000 and features an exclusive behind the scenes interview from Jeter's Manhattan apartment.

I highly doubt Thome will get the same EPIC-STYLE attention.

And finally, there's A-Rod--


The Yankees and the YES Network did everything in their power to hype up his "milestone" 600th home run last season, but as the above picture illustrates, many people around the country had a different opinion. Even amongst Yankee fans that I spoke to, there were mix feelings.

With 2762 hits, A-Rod is the odds-on-favorite to become the next member of the exclusive 3000-hit club. It'll be interesting to see if he gets the same Jeter-type love when his chase begins.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Good-Bye Carlos!

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The word on the street is that Carlos Beltran to the San Francisco Giants is all but a done deal. All the Mets need is for Beltran to waive his no-trade clause and he's off to Frisco. So as a Mets fan, let me say GOOD-BYE now because it sounds like a sweet deal and he would be foolish not to take it. So as far as I'm concerned-- he's outta here!

The Giants are in excellent position to return to the playoffs and defend their World Series championship. This would be a great opportunity for Beltran who hasn't seen any playoff action since the 2006 NLCS. You know, the one where he struck out on 3 pitches, the last being a called third strike, against the St. Louis Cardinals Adam Wainwright to end the series and put the Cardinals in the World Series. An at-bat that has gone down as perhaps the most infamous in New York Mets history. That 2006 NLCS.

Oh yeah, almost forgot-- he struck out on 3 pitches with the bases loaded to end the game, leaving the tying and winning runs on base. That's the 2006 NLCS I'm referring to. But then again, who's remembering?

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But seriously, with the Giants, Beltran can perhaps write a new chapter in his playoff book and put 2006 behind him. So in my opinion he should take the gig because there's nothing happening here with the Mets and in ownership's eyes, he has overextended his welcome here. This is "rebuild city" from what I'm seeing.

So GOOD LUCK in Frisco, Carlos.

As for his new teammate, Brian Wilson....

AP Photo
I guess the bearded-one knew something we didn't know when he was announcing the NL starting line-up at the All-Star Game. Hey Brian, since you also spoke to President Obama the other day, what did he say is going to happen with this debt crisis thing?

And finally, I wonder how Mr. Met is handling all the chaos surrounding his team?


Don't worry Mr. Met, I'm just as much a disgruntled Mets fan as you are.

UPDATE (7-28-11): Beltran accepts trade to Giants! http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news;_ylt=Ak1RPP6lj6Aikb9RyrLbjhgRvLYF?slug=ap-giants-beltran

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Mr. President.... Meet Brian Wilson!

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When President Barack Obama gave his prime-time speech on the debt crisis last night I was trying to figure out why he seemed a little uptight. People can say what they want about the president but one thing he's never been accused of is not being able to give a masterful speech. So it seemed kind of odd to me that he looked a little tense.

Well, earlier in the day, the president welcomed the World Champion San Francisco Giants to the White House and maybe that had something to do with it. Is it possible that his encounter with the bearded-one Brian Wilson had something to do with his edginess last night? Could be.

Here's what the president said of Wilson--

"And then there’s the guy with the beard. Where's he? (Laughter.) I do fear it. (Laughter.) Have you guys seen the SportsCenter ad where it's -- ESPN -- where it starts doing a dance? (Laughter.)

Now, underneath Brian’s beard, and the spandex tuxedo -- (laughter) -- and the sea captain costume, and the cleats with his face on them -- is also one of the most dominant closers in baseball. (Applause.) And I do think, Brian, you should know that Michelle was very relieved that the press was going to be talking about what somebody else wears here in the White House –(laughter) -- so that it’s not just her making a fashion statement."

Hmmm? "I do fear it"? So maybe that's what had him a little edgy?

Through his humor the president nailed it. Wilson is one of the most dominant closers in the game, which is a huge reason why he gets away with, well, what he gets away with.

AP Photo
Wow! Wilson stared the president down as if he was the tying run at the plate.

AP Photo
Is it me or Wilson is the one guy the Secret Service could have confused as an impostor and kept a close eye on him?

Maybe during the off-season Wilson could work as a special envoy to one of these rogue nations that don't like us. I mean, the guy can intimidate just about anybody. Sheesh!

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Relax, Mr. President. I hear he's not as bad as he looks.

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For a great piece on Brian Wilson go to Cleavie Wonder's blog.

Monday, July 25, 2011

The MLB on TSC: The Lonesome Roads Clubs

AP Photo
The Major League Baseball season has crossed it's 100th game of the season which means that 60% of the regular season is in the books. And for some hard-luck teams, the end of the season isn't coming fast enough.

Let's take a look at some of those teams--

1. The Houston Astros (33-68) lost 67 of their first 100 games, marking this the worst 100-game start in Astros history. The "Stros need to win, at least, 30 of their remaining 61 games to avoid the first 100-loss season in team history.

I wonder if "El Caballo" Carlos Lee knows this?

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2. The Chicago Cubs (42-60) WON their 100th, 101st and 102nd games of the season. Sounds good, right? Well, this was their first 3-game winning streak of the season. I'm no expert, but um, 3-game winning streaks should first happen, you know, during the first 12 games of the season, not in game 102. This doesn't help our efforts to end this "curse" thing, Cubs. Try and win 3 in a row a "little" bit earlier next season if you want that annoying billy goat to go away.

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For the record, the Cubs elusive 3-game winning streak FINALLY came against, well, the Houston Astros.

3. The Seattle Mariners (43-58) were 43-43 and only 2.5 games out of 1st place on July 5. That was then. Unfortunately, a club-record 15-game losing streak has derailed the team and ended their season early. What the heck, manager Eric Wedge might as well grow back the mustache.

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By the way, couldn't the M's set the club record on any other day and not on Pat Gillick's big day?

Finally--

4. The Kansas City Royals (42-59) were 11-6 on April 19. Back then I said, "Oh goodie! If they play .500 baseball the rest of the way, they'll have a winning season". Well, they've gone 31-53 since then. Doesn't look like .500 baseball, does it? Someone please remind me not to root for the Royals next season. Thank goodness the Pirates are keeping their promise so far.

Anyway, I'm getting depressed writing this post, so let me end it here.

Later!

Oh! Sorry Billy, didn't mean it in a bad way.

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar Get Their Day!

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Today is a special day for Bert Blyleven and Roberto Alomar as they will soon be officially inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Alomar was voted in by the BBWAA with 90.0% of the vote in his second year of eligibility. He had a stellar career with 2724 hits, 210 HR, 1134 RBI, .300 BA, 10 Gold Gloves and 2 World Series titles. The 12-time All-Star second baseman certainly had the numbers to be a first-ballot Hall of Famer but many believe an unfortunate incident where Alomar spit on umpire John Hirschbeck's face during an argument tarnished his image and cost him a few crucial votes last year, thus denying him of first-ballot status. Alomar wound up with 73.7% of the vote just missing the required 75% in his first year of eligibility.

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In later years, Alomar would make peace with Hirschbeck and made all necessary efforts to repair his image. In fact, Hirschbeck himself has said that Alomar deserves to be in the Hall of Fame. Well today the day has come for Alomar.

Blyleven's road to enshrinement was quite a bit longer than Alomar's. It took Blyleven 14 years on the ballot to finally creep in with 79.7% of the vote. He too fell a whisker short last year with 74.2% of the vote. When hearing the news that he had (finally) been elected, Blyleven said, "It’s been 14 years of praying and waiting. I thank the Baseball Writers of America for, I’m going to say, finally getting it right."

For his career Blyleven was 287-250, with 3701 K, 60 shutouts and a 3.31 ERA. Over the years, many people have criticized him for being a .500 pitcher who was only an innings-chewer and some have said he wasn't even Hall of Fame-worthy. Others keep pointing to his eye-popping 250 career losses and have suggested that it's one of the reasons why it took 14 years for him to "barely" get in.

In his column today, AP Sports writer John Kekis wrote, "Though he lost 250 games, Blyleven threw 60 shutouts (ninth all time) and logged 242 complete games, finishing his career in 1992 with 3,701 strikeouts (fifth all time). He also made 685 starts (11th all time), pitched 4,969 1-3 innings (14th all time), and was 3-0 in League Championship Series play and 2-1 in World Series games."

The key word in Mr. Kekis piece is "though"-- though he lost 250 games-- as if that's a bad thing.

Well let's take a look at that. Is losing 250 games a bad thing?

Here's a list of the 10 all-time leaders in career losses:

1. Cy Young+ - 316
2. Pud Galvin+ - 310
3. Nolan Ryan+ - 292
4. Walter Johnson+ - 279
5. Phil Niekro+ - 274
6. Gaylord Perry+ - 265
7. Don Sutton+ - 256
8. Jack Powell - 254
9. Eppa Rixey+ - 251
10. Bert Blyleven+ - 250

+ Baseball Hall of Famers

As we can see, only some of the greatest pitchers of all-time are on the list. With the exception of Jack Powell (who pitched in the dead-ball era), every pitcher on the list is in the Hall of Fame.

The point is, for you to hang around long enough to lose 250 games, you must be doing something right for many many years. Career losses could be deceiving because, as the list proves, only some of the game's immortals have been able to lose 250 games. This tells me that in many of those games they pitched well enough to win otherwise they wouldn't have been in the league for all those years.

And looking at it from a different angle-- based on the stats, if you lose 250 games, you have a 90% chance of making it to the Hall of Fame.

So the notion that Blyleven's 250 losses was a detriment to his career is simply not true because, from what I see, only iconic pitchers have what it takes to reach that milestone. And if I'm Blyleven, I'd be proud to be on that list with all those all-time greats, no question about it.

Blyleven touring the Hall of Fame. Courtesy: Topics.areavoices.com
Congratulations to Blyleven and Alomar, they both are well-deserving of this honor.

MY 2012 HALL OF FAME PREDICTION: Barry Larkin with 81% of the vote.

Stats courtesy of baseball-reference.com

Friday, July 22, 2011

AL Cy Young Award Watch

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The race for the AL Cy Young Award has, pretty much, come down to three horses-- Jered Weaver, Justin Verlander and CC Sabathia. All three are the ace of their (respective) pitching staffs and all three are having potential-career years.

Coincidentally, all 3 pitched yesterday and combined for 23 innings and allowed ONLY 3 earned runs between them. Weaver pitched 7 innings, 0 runs, in a 1-0 victory, out-dueling the Rangers' C.J. Wilson. Verlander pitched 8 innings, 1 run, in a 6-2 win over the Twins. Sabathia pitched 8 innings, 2 runs, but was out-dueled 2-1 by the Rays' James Shields.

Here's a look at their 2011 stats thus far--

1. JERED WEAVER

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13-4 W-L, 129 K, 1.81 ERA, 35 BB, 0.95 WHIP, 19 Quality Starts

2. JUSTIN VERLANDER

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13-5 W-L, 162 K, 2.24 ERA, 33 BB, 0.88 WHIP, 20 Quality Starts

3. CC SABATHIA

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14-5 W-L, 142 K, 2.62 ERA, 42 BB, 1.14 WHIP, 14 Quality Starts

Some quick notes:
  • Jered Weaver is in a class by himself. He started the season 6-0, then went 0-4 and is currently on a 7-0 run. Who can figure this guy out? It's no secret he's been criticized in the past for being inconsistent but as we can see, he's usually more consistent than inconsistent.
  • Weaver has pitched at least seven innings and allowed no more than one run in 11 games this season (tying him with Justin Verlander for the major-league high), including six of his last seven starts.
  • As for Verlander, since 2009, he is 23-6 with a 2.60 ERA in 34 starts against the AL Central. So if the Tigers haven't done butkus in the last 3 seasons, can't blame their ace.
  • CC Sabathia took a tough 2-1 loss yesterday against the Tampa Bay Rays on his 31st birthday. At 31, CC is 171-92 for his career, a .650 winning percentage. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, over the last 100 years (1911-2011) only five other pitchers turned 31 years old with at least 170 career victories and a winning percentage of .650 or higher: Christy Mathewson in 1911 (282-130, .684), Chief Bender in 1915 (193-102, .654), Grover Cleveland Alexander in 1918 (190-88, .683), Juan Marichal in 1968 (170-77, .688) and Jim Palmer in 1976 (174-93, .652). Talk about historical! No doubt, CC has been "da man" throughout his career and potentially the next 300-game winner.
So there it is. It's more than likely, one of the (above) three superstars, is our 2011 AL Cy Young Award winner.

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I have my money on the lanky dude in Los Angeles.

Stats courtesy of the Elias Sports Bureau

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Rangers-Red Sox: On A Collision Course

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The Texas Rangers, recent winners of a major-league-best 11 games in a row, and the Boston Red Sox, recent winners of 9 out of 10 games, are 2 of the top 3 elite teams in the American League. Of course, the New York Yankees would be the third-- don't want to bruise any Yankee egos by not mentioning them.

If the season ended today there is a very high probability that the Red Sox and the Rangers would face each other in the playoffs, either in the wild-card round or in the ALCS.

If the Yankees win the East, then chances are, the Red Sox and Rangers would meet in the first round.

If the Red Sox win the East, then most likely they will have to play each other in the ALCS, which is a high probability. There's no reason why the Red Sox shouldn't easily defeat the anemic AL Central winner in the ALDS and there's no reason why the Rangers shouldn't defeat the Yankees in the ALDS after the spanking they gave them last year in the ALCS.

Anyway, the way this thing is unfolding, it looks like the Red Sox and Rangers are on a playoff collision course.

And it's a series I like forward to because of the many story-lines, particularly as it pertains to the 1999 and 2000 MLB Drafts. Here's a look--
  • It'll mark the first time that 1999 No. 1 overall pick Josh Hamilton faces 1999 No. 2 overall pick Josh Beckett in an all-important playoff series. When Beckett was winning championships with the Florida Marlins and the Red Sox a lot was made about how the then-Tampa Bay Devil Rays made a fatal mistake in taking Hamilton over Beckett with the No. 1 pick. Of course, this was during the time when Hamilton was going through the roughest period of his life with drug and alcohol addiction. And as is always the case, it's very easy to knock a man when he's down. Those detractors ended up with "egg on their face" as they underestimated Hamilton's relentless will to survive and persevere. The Great One worked his way back to the majors and is now the leader of the dangerous Rangers (Murderer's Row) lineup. Beckett is still the leader of the excellent Red Sox pitching staff. A Beckett-Hamilton confrontation in a crucial playoff series is (most definitely) a must see.
  • Who will put up better numbers during the series? The 2010 AL MVP Hamilton or the more-than-likely 2011 AL MVP Adrian Gonzalez, who was the No. 1 overall pick in 2000, the year after the Hamilton-Beckett draft. 
  • Or maybe Ian Kinsler will steal the show? Kinsler was the 879th pick in 2000, the year Gonzalez went No. 1.
  • Or will Carl Crawford light it up and be the series MVP? Crawford was the 52nd pick in the Hamilton-Beckett draft of 1999.
  • Or will John Lackey win a crucial game for Boston? He was the 68th pick in 1999.
  • Will Bobby Jenks pitch in a crucial late-inning situation for the BoSox and preserve a slim lead? Jenks was the 140th pick in the 2000 draft.
  • And finally, will Mike Napoli be the unexpected hero for the Rangers with a series-changing clutch hit? Napoli was the 500th pick in the 2000 draft.

So as we can see, the 1999 and 2000 drafts produced a lot of key pieces for these two AL juggernauts.

Anyway, I'm sure Yankee fans and "whoever-comes-out-of the-central" fans have other ideas but there's no question that the Red Sox-Rangers will be the "Clash of the Titans" series to watch out for.

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I hear you, Mo!

UPDATE: The Rangers ran their winning streak to a major-league season-high 12 games in a row.

Pittsburgh Pirates: Alone At The Top!

NL Central
W
L
Pct
GB

Pittsburgh Pirates
50
44
.532
--

St. Louis Cardinals
50
45
.526
0.5

Milwaukee Brewers
51
46
.526
0.5

Cincinnati Reds
47
49
.490
4.0

Chicago Cubs
39
58
.402
12.5

Houston Astros
31
65
.323
20.0


ENJOY IT PIRATES FANS!

Ya haven't seen this in a LOOOONG time!

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ATTENDANCE: 1,083,009 thru 46 home games-- 21st in the major leagues. This is decent compared to the past. So show up to the ballpark and crack the 2,000,000 milestone, Pirates Nation, and support your team-- 'cause they are for real!


Go Pirates!

Monday, July 18, 2011

Josh Beckett, Jeff Niemann, Juan Marichal and Warren Spahn

Last night, the Boston Red Sox and the Tampa Bay Rays played a game for the ages as the Red Sox squeaked by the Rays 1-0 in 16 innings. Second baseman Dustin Pedroia hit an RBI-single in the top of the 16th inning to FINALLY break a scoreless tie in what will be remembered as a masterful pitchers duel.

The game was so well pitched that according to the Elias Sports Bureau, the 8 combined hits (Boston - 5, Tampa Bay - 3) is the lowest hit total in any major-league game of 14 or more innings in the live-ball era (that is, a total of 1349 such games since 1920).

Starters Josh Beckett and Jeff Niemann both pitched 8 scoreless innings and both bullpens pitched 8 rock-solid innings of their own.

The 16-inning, 1-0 score reminded me of what is considered by many, including me, the greatest game in major league history-- the iconic 16-inning, 1-0, pitching duel between Hall of Famers Juan Marichal and Warren Spahn on July 2, 1963.

The scores were the same. The number of innings were the same. The only difference is that Marichal and Spahn both pitched complete games where as Boston and Tampa Bay used a combined 15 pitchers in their game. This is an amazing comparison of how the game of baseball as evolved in the last 50 years. It took 15 pitchers last night to do what 2 pitchers did 48 years ago. Amazing! I highly doubt the Marichal-Spahn extravaganza will ever be duplicated again, at least not in my lifetime.

But in the end the results were the same. Here's a look at the pitching box scores for both games:

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Red Sox 1 - Tampa Bay 0, 16 innings (July 17, 2011)
 
Boston

IP
H
R
ER
BB
K
HR
WHIP
Season ERA
J. Beckett
8.0
1
0
0
0
6
0
0.89
2.12

D. Bard
1.0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0.82
1.94

M. Albers
1.2
1
0
0
0
2
0
1.24
2.37

F. Morales
1.1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0.96
2.16

A. Aceves (W, 5-1)
3.0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1.17
3.13

J. Papelbon (S, 21)
1.0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1.19
3.96












Tampa Bay

IP
H
R
ER
BB
K
HR
WHIP
Season ERA
J. Niemann
8.0
2
0
0
2
10
0
1.30
3.94

K. Farnsworth
1.0
1
0
0
2
1
0
0.92
1.89

J. Peralta
0.1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1.12
4.07

J.P. Howell
0.2
0
0
0
3
0
0
1.66
7.47

J. McGee
0.1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1.88
4.50

J. Cruz
0.2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1.24
3.44

C. Ramos
1.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.24
3.72

B. Gomes
3.0
0
0
0
2
3
0
1.50
2.35

A. Russell (L, 1-2)
1.0
2
1
1
1
0
0
1.56
3.03



Giants 1 - Braves 0, 16 innings (July 2, 1963)

Milwaukee Braves IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA






Warren Spahn, L (11-4) 15.19111212.84









San Francisco Giants IP H R ER BB SO HR ERA






Juan Marichal, W (13-3)16 80041002.14







For the record, the Giants won the game on a Willie Mays solo-home run off of Spahn in the bottom of the 16th inning. It still mind-boggles me every time I read up on that game.